Great architecture deserves our attention and care.

Preserving Charles Moore's architecture is a continual effort.

 

Why does all this effort matter?

 

Because people come from all over the world to see these places and be inspired by Moore's brilliant vision and extraordinary talent.

Here are just some of our recent preservation and restoration projects.

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Burns House

Ahrend & Brunzema Organ Restoration

Organ Builders Manuel Rosales and Greg Harrold completed a nine-month long project to restore and tune the Ahrend & Brunzema organ that was custom built for Lee Burns in 1967.

 

Rosales and Harrold's work included the restoration of deteriorated leather components, the construction of a new bellows and new enclosure for the organ’s blower and motor, a new control system for the blower motor, repair of the tremolo, and complete cleaning and tonal regulation of the 546 pipes. 

 

Seismic bracing was enhanced, including a new platform from which the pipework in the upper case can be accessed more efficiently.

 

Rosales and Harrold's final phase at the Burns House allowed them to complete the tuning in its original temperament of “Werckmeister III”, preparing the instrument for upcoming concerts and residencies.

The Leland Burns Estate & Trust made this restoration possible. Thank you.

We are so grateful to Stephen Harby and Karen Simonson for their support and organizational efforts!

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Moore/Andersson Compound

Courtyard Restoration

Before the pandemic descended upon us, the Foundation had already scheduled a complete restoration of the compound's central courtyard. Since we could not have workers on site, Foundation Director Kevin Keim undertook the work himself. For the past 18 months, he has virtually singlehandedly demolished and rebuilt the entire courtyard structure.

After removing all of the deteriorating decking, Kevin decided not only would the entire underlying structure need to be rebuilt, but far more robust foundations and footings had to be formed and poured. Fill from the original construction was removed and the site regraded. Drainage catch basins and conduits were added. Eight of the massive 9"x9"x10' cypress arbor columns were temporarily removed so that robust blocks could be built to convey loads to new footings. New electric and irrigation conduits were added. The pool-length bench frame was rebuilt from post-and-beam Western Red Cedar timber, and a new bench added to the lower garden, in part to counteract the overturning moment of the one above. 

All framing was constructed with high grade pressure treated lumber, screwed together with steel connections. Careful structural negotiations had to be made to compensate for irregularities in the original historic building fabric. Once the new diaphragms, beams, and stringers were completed, Kevin then carefully cut and installed the new Kebony risers, steps, and slats.

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We are so grateful to KebonyUSA and Alex & Robbie Robinette for contributing the gorgeous finish timber for this project!

And thank you to James Hardie for contributing panels for the restoration of the courtyard's walls and piers!

Charles Moore House

Textile Preservation & Restoration

Since textiles fade with age and UV, the Foundation's Director learned to sew and has been renewing pillows, cushions and fabrics in the Charles Moore House. 

The textiles come from a range of places—Mexico, Guatemala, Peru, India, Indonesia, Thailand, Finland.

While some cushions could be carefully disassembled with a seam ripper, reversed, and re-sewn to extend their lives, others were replaced with textiles Charles Moore kept in storage.

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Jane Louis so expertly and patiently gave me brilliant sewing machine lessons. I'm so thankful!